Round-trip translation: no more entertainment with PNMT™ systems

Round-trip translation (RTT), also known as back-and-forth translation, recursive translation and bi-directional translation, is the process of translating a word, phrase or text into another language (forward translation), then translating the result back into the original language (back translation), using machine translation (MT) software.
It is often used by laypeople to evaluate a machine translation system, or to test whether a text is suitable for MT when they are unfamiliar with the target language. Because the resulting text can often differ substantially from the original, RTT can also be a source of entertainment*.

When we translate the paragraph below…

…with SYSTRAN Pure Neural™ Machine Translation (PNMT™) we get the translation into French : Continue reading

State of the Union: The Next Generation of NLP

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In 1968, during the height of the Cold War, our nation’s intelligence organizations and military were working to decipher and understand Russian communication threads coming through their offices. Answering the call, SYSTRAN was born. We provided the vital translation software that our nation’s security forces required in order to do their job effectively.

Back then, we were providing our services through the IBM mainframe. Thankfully technology got smaller and more advanced, allowing SYSTRAN to move into several different areas. With the advent of the PC, we developed a product that people can use on the desktop, translating text into 130+ language combinations, enabling real-time multilingual communication across the globe.

Then recently, just in the last decade, we experienced further advancements through the smartphone. Speech recognition software along with the smartphone provided a plethora of breakthroughs. For example, SYSTRAN developed S-Translator, the official translation solution on the Samsung Galaxy S and Note series. Now if you’re in a taxi in Korea you can use your phone to tell someone where to go without speaking a word of the native language.

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Huffington Post Interview with Ken Behan – Have Multilingual Customers? Here’s a Solution for You

This article was originally published on The Huffington Post  Have Multilingual Customers? Here’s a Solution for You (Interview With Ken Behan)

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“Languages are intriguing and challenging at the same time”

As kids we were always intrigued by the way Google Translator worked. While it translated those famous French quotes for us, there were limitations which even Google couldn’t surpass. Since then, language has been a barrier— hindering our global crusades. Be it a worldwide competition or business meetups across countries, a common language would have been the best idea which sadly is pretty hard thing to materialize.

Even readers at the Huffingtonpost must have had difficulties with other country specific domains, offering great pieces of work which couldn’t be accessed— owing the language barrier.

Here we interview Ken Behan, Vice President, SYSTRAN Software Inc. and understand what sort of challenges we face when it comes to a multilingual platform like the Internet. We will be asking him about the process involved with translations and analysis apart from the levels of accuracy. Lastly, he will be talking about the company and what purposes it can serve, towards the common good of this society.

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The Top Security Threats Exposed in the First Half of 2016

Heading into 2016 there has been an increased awareness of the threat of possible data breaches and IT security threats worldwide. Following a challenging 2015 that was characterized by multiple large retailers experiencing massive data breaches as well as federal security threats, it is thought that more than 16,000 cyber attacks will be attempted in 2016. The Federal Government recently released the 2016 Data Threat Report which collated data from IT experts and government entities to discuss and ranks the biggest security threats. The study found that 90 percent of those surveyed believed their organizationwas vulnerable to a data breach. Of that 90 percent, 61 percent experienced a data breach including 1 in 5 within the past year. That is a startlingly high assessment for the experts charged with keeping the nation’s data secure. We took a look at the top security threats exposed early in 2016 to help your company identify arising security challenges, possibly within your own organization. Here is what we found:

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6 Powerful Tips For Effective & Efficient Multi-Language Customer Support

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1. Increase your deflection rate by translating your self-service knowledge centers into multiple languages. 2. Improve satisfaction with the self-service experience by setting expectations up front. 3. Scale customer service into new regions by supporting additional languages. 4. Respond to … Continue reading

Cross Language Processing for 2016 Summer Olympics Content Generation

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This summer, the social media sphere will be buzzing again with fans and athletes posting about the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It will be the first Olympic games to take place in South America. You can also expect networks, publishers, and brands to get in on the social media experience by generating more content than ever before.

Looking back to the London games in 2012, just the social media interactions on Twitter alone were vast in terms of engagement:

– On Twitter, there were 960K mentions for Bolt, 830K for Phelps, and 490K for Tom Daley (British diver who took the bronze) during the games.
– The first day of Olympics, there were 3 million tweets in total.

The numbers go on and on, especially when you take into account all the views, likes, tweets by sports teams, athletes, and brands. There are plenty of useful stats out there from archives of the first ever “Social Games” as most tech blogs described it.

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Is Your Team Violating Data Compliance Laws with Online Translation Tools?

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It happens all too often: employees unknowingly put their company at risk of a security breach by putting confidential information where it doesn’t belong.

In 2015, The Open Security Foundation estimates that there were 1,472 incidents involving the theft or exposure of personal, confidential or proprietary data in the United States alone. Many of these incidents involved the leak of personally identifiable information, including names, birth dates, email addresses, social security numbers, bank account information, home addresses, employment records and even income data. Millions of customers, patients and employees have been affected by these leaks.

Despite IT’s diligence in protecting data, many times employees are the ones putting the data at risk. According to a study released by the Identity Theft Resource Center, approximately 15 percent of data breaches in 2015 were caused by employee error or negligence.

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