What Does the Post-Language Economy Look Like

This article was originally published on Inc. What Does the Post-Language Economy Look Like.

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How translation technology is changing the face of small business on a global scale.

The greatest barrier to global trade is not space and time, or even geopolitics. The greatest barrier today is language. Only major corporations have been able to set up mirror offices and global operations networks to facilitate international trade. Human translators, an expensive resource, act as bridges between producers and consumers or business partners who speak different languages. But this is an imperfect solution to a significant challenge. Very few people are fluent, or even competent, in more than a handful of languages, making it difficult for companies to do business in more than a handful of countries.

Much of the world’s economy is comprised of small businesses that do not have the resources to overcome dozens of language barriers in countries all over the world. But if small businesses could overcome the language barrier, what would the global market look like? Where would we be if the ‘mom and pop’ stores that fuel our local economies were able to join the global market?

“There is a wealth of potential in start-ups and entrepreneurial businesses all around the world,” says Denis Gachot, CEO of Systran Group. “One of the biggest obstacles to harnessing that potential is the language barrier. Neural Machine Translation (NMT) is working to bring that wall down.”

Neural Machine Translation

A natural step in the progression of communication technologies, NMT is a tool that connects people who would otherwise have no means to understand one another. The technology is aimed at translating large volumes of business communications almost instantly and with more effectiveness than human operators.

Unlike preceding translation technologies, NMT builds a neural center of information that can be tuned for more apt translations. The network approach sidesteps the bottleneck often seen in translation technology that hinders the improvement of encoder-decoder systems. This “soft-alignment” is a reflection of our own intuition, so these language translations done by a machine are more human than ever. “This technology is of a caliber that deserves the attention of everyone in the field,” says Gachot. “It can translate at near-human levels of accuracy and can translate massive volumes of information exponentially faster than we can operate.”

NMT is an end-to-end learning system, so it learns and corrects itself through continued use. Picking up patterns in languages for more accurate translations, NMT systems will continue to improve with time and application, making them the ideal employee.

But part of the beauty of this system is that it is a scalable technology and capable of processing volumes of information exponentially faster than humans are able to. This makes NMT an affordable option for small businesses looking to take their products into more markets. Doors previously closed because of the language barrier are now swinging open. And the world is changing for it.

Companies Using NMT as Plugin

The last year has seen huge leaps in NMT technology. While it remains a tool predominantly for larger businesses, NMT is proving its salt as a revolutionary force in the international market. In September, Google researchers announced their version for this technology, which translates entire sentences instead of just single words, providing a more authentic and relevant translation. Currently, it functions in eight major world languages, able to service some 35 percent of the earth’s population.

Already, NMT is being used in clouds and network plugins. Facebook announced in March of last year that they would be using neural networks for their own page translations.

But most exciting in this progression of NMT is its ability to change the way small businesses have been able to contribute to the global market. Google and Systran are racing to roll out NMT in new languages, already delivering dozens of language pairs. The linguistic technology now facilitates communication in 130 different languages, providing real solutions for internal collaboration, online customer support and eDiscovery in multilingual contexts.

What this means practically is that an online store owner in St. Petersburg, Russia is now able to reach a customer in Montevideo, Uruguay and market and discuss her product with reliable translation technology as the go-between.

Economic Outcomes

Small businesses are key to economic strength. Properly equipped with tools and resources, they have the power to grow and shape economies at any scale. Smarter regulations and tax structures are not the only factors at play here. These businesses need to be able to pursue consumers wherever they may be.

According to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), 99.7 percent of all employer firms are small businesses. They have generated 64 percent of new jobs, and paid 44 percent of the total United States private payroll in the last 20 years. The prospect of enabling these small businesses to broaden their customer base and compete in the global market is more than exciting; it is world-changing.

Gachot adds, “For many years, we have tried to deal with language as if it was a barrier for communication – while with neural machine translation, language difference is what makes the richness of communication between different cultures.”

NMT looks to be the pivoting step for global trade. With the language wall crumbling, more small businesses will be able to bring their unique, quality-crafted products and services onto the international market scene, which is good for everyone.

SYSTRAN’s team is setting private meetings for an exclusive view of the PNMT concept. For more information, contact Craig Stern at craig.stern@systrangroup.com and to set up a meeting, click here.

Related Links

SYSTRAN PNMT DEMO

Positive Feedback from PNMT Beta Tester

This article was originally published on Inc. What Does the Post-Language Economy Look Like.

Digital platforms and the post-language economy

This article was originally published on ITProPortal Digital platforms and the post-language economy by Denis Gachot.

The world can get even smaller, and new technology is making that happen.

When we imagine international companies, we think large, publicly traded conglomerates that have substantial resources and funds to facilitate operations on opposite ends of the globe. But that is changing.

Already the Internet has shrunk the world so that small companies now rely on software engineers in Pakistan and marketing agencies contract with graphic designers in the Philippines. But the world can get even smaller, and new technology is making that happen.

Today, the new frontier is language. Individuals have a plethora of platforms that allow them to access consumers all over the globe and work with other companies in faraway places – if only they could speak the same language. In an ironic twist, language has turned from something that first facilitated human cooperation and growth, to something that currently impedes our ability to work together.

Technology may finally be ready to abolish that barrier forever. It is somewhat remarkable that in 2017, more than 20 years after widespread use of the Internet began, we still rely almost exclusively on humans to translate language in commercial formats. But translation bears all of the earmarks of those functions that artificial intelligence ought to be capable of replicating, and a technology called Neural Machine Translation (NMT) does just that.

Contextual translation ability

By leveraging its contextual translation ability alongside its deep learning functions, NMT has achieved historic results in the journey to a post-language economy. In a side-by-side comparison with human translators, in a technical domain translation for English-Korean, SYSTRAN’s NMT translations were preferred 41 per cent of the time. That success is achieved by advancing language translation beyond rule-based translation methods.

Before NMT, machine translation models – known as rules-based or ‘phrase-based’ – were only able to reference five to seven words at a time when determining meaning. Each language pair has its own linguistic challenges, but it made the translation for certain languages, like Japanese, more challenging because you need to know the entire sentence to put all of the words into context.

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Let’s say a colleague forwards you an urgent email, and it includes this sentence: パリに出張の時に私はCEOに会いました.

With a phrase-based machine translation, you would receive this output: ‘I met Paris in the CEO trip doing business.’ With NMT, you would get: ‘I met the CEO when I was in Paris on a business trip.’

In Japanese, main verbs are placed at the end, so you need to reference the end of a sentence to make sense of the phrases within it. NMT processes the entire sentence (and soon paragraph) from end-to-end without intermediate stages.

That is why context is so important. The effect of machine translation being able to better understand context results in a huge jump in BLEU score (the industry measurement for accuracy). SYSTRAN’s Pure Neural Machine Translation (PNMT) program has seen increases in all 61 language pairs and where we see the biggest increase is in Asian languages. For some languages, we saw a jump of 200 per cent in BLEU score.

Gisting

With machine translation, we have a metric called ‘Gisting,’ as in ‘you get the gist.’ In addition to this metric, we test whether or not a user can solve their problem with the translated output. Were they able to search a FAQ and customise a piece of software with the answer? Were they able to search a digital database of products and images and find what they were looking to purchase? If yes, then they got the gist.

“Gisting requires extensive post-editing. NMT has moved us into fluency. What fluency allows is the ability to read and understand so that you no longer need to post edit,” says Ken Behan, V.P. of Sales and Marketing. NMT is allowing us to focus on ‘meaning’ and ‘fluency’ scores. With fluency, we ask if the translation sounds like a native speaker wrote it. With fluency and meaning, we can ask:

Were they able to understand a review and make an educated decision? Were they able to read the manual specs and assemble a piece of heavy machinery? Were they able to find a product, read the description and purchase what they were expecting?

Refer to the English translations above. With the first sentence, did you get the gist? Yes! You could infer someone went to Paris on something business related.

With the second, did you understand the meaning and the fluency? Yes, you can understand what kind of trip it was and what happened.

New solutions

Neural Machine Translation will further advance traditional MT solutions and create new ones in communication, customer support, e-Learning, eDiscovery, compliance and user-generated content to name a few. Also, early-adopting linguists using NMT are already increasing their productivity.

Similar to the human brain, the neural machine translator learns through a process in which the machine receives a series of stimuli over several weeks. This development, based on complex algorithms at the forefront of Deep Learning, enables the PNMT engine to learn, generalise the rules of a language from a given translated text, and produce a translation close to human levels of competency.

You can think of NMT as part of your international go-to-market strategy. In theory, the Internet erased geographical barriers and allowed players of all sizes from all places to compete in what we often call a ‘global economy,’ But we’re not all global competitors because not all of us can communicate in the 26 languages that have 50 million or more speakers. NMT removes language barriers, enabling new and existing players to be global communicators, and thus real global competitors. We’re living in the post-internet economy, and we’re stepping into the post-language economy.

The difference between previous language technologies and what NMT can do today is remarkable, and business leaders should take note. Just ask yourself who you would want to do business with: the guy that says, “I met Paris in the CEO trip doing business,” or the one that says, “I met the CEO when I was in Paris on a business trip.”

SYSTRAN’s team is setting private meetings for an exclusive view of the PNMT concept. For more information, contact Craig Stern at craig.stern@systrangroup.com and to set up a meeting, click here.

Related Links

SYSTRAN PNMT DEMO

Positive Feedback from PNMT Beta Tester

This article was originally published on ITProPortal Digital platforms and the post-language economy by Denis Gachot.

SYSTRAN’s Continuing Neural MT Evolution

by Kirti Vashee on eMpTy Pages, a blog about translation technology, localization and collaboration

Recently, I had the opportunity and kind invitation to attend the SYSTRAN community day event where many members of their product development, marketing, and management team gathered with major customers and partners.

The objective was to share information about the continuing evolution of their new Pure Neural MT (PNMT) technology,  share detailed PNMT output quality evaluation results, and provide initial customer user experience data with the new technology. Also, naturally such an event creates a more active and intense dialogue between company employees and customers and partners.  This, I think has substantial value for a company that seeks to align product offerings with its customer’s actual needs.

Ongoing Enhancements of the PNMT Product Offering

The event made it clear that SYSTRAN is well down the NMT path, possibly years ahead of other MT vendors, and provided a review of the current status of their rapidly evolving PNMT technology.

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SYSTRAN is far along the NMT path

A Deep Dive into SYSTRAN’s Neural Machine Translation (NMT) Technology

by Kirti Vashee on eMpTy Pages, a blog about translation technology, localization and collaboration

Neural Machine Translation

[…] So, I recently had a conversation with Jean Senellart , Global CTO and SYSTRAN SAS Director General, to find out more about their new NMT technology. He was very forthcoming, and responded to all my questions with useful details, anecdotes and enthusiasm. The conversation only reinforced in my mind that “real MT system development” is something best left to experts, and not something that even large LSPs should dabble with. The reality and complexity of NMT development pushes the limits of MT even further away from the DIY mirage.

In the text below, I have put quotes around everything that I have gotten directly from SYSTRAN material or from Jean Senellart (JAS) to make it clear that I am not interpreting. I have done some minor editing to facilitate readability and “English flow” and added comments in italics within his quotes where this is done.

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SYSTRAN announces the launch of its “Purely Neural MT” engine, a revolution for the machine translation market

The first engine to be based on neural models and deep learning, delivering unparalleled translation quality!

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Project “PNMT” (Purely Neural Machine Translation) was this year’s flagship project for the researchers and developers at SYSTRAN, the leading provider in machine translation and natural language processing, confirming its pioneer position for over 40 years.

SYSTRAN brings its expertise to the sector in several ways: contributing to research on neural models; applying its know-how in terminology to increase the potential of Neural Machine Translation; and industrializing technology to make it available to companies, organizations and individuals.

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